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Tennessee Lake Management and Tennessee Pond Management: the Coming Revolution

Why do we manage Tennessee ponds and lakes? Because there are very few things on this earth we get more enjoyment from than giving landowners their dream fishing escapes. It never gets old seeing people experience fishing of a caliber they never thought possible, on their own water.

Part of the reason I post to this blog is the same reason any business owner with a blog on his website posts: to up my SEO ranking and therefore bring more people like yourself to the site. SEO is a vital component of any successful business these days, and it has helped my business tremendously.

I know of people who have taught themselves SEO and thus been able to handle this portion of their marketing themselves, saving the money they would pay to someone else. It has been a while since business was slow enough such that I could even begin to think about having the time to learn something like SEO myself, and because I don’t like to do anything halfway, I pay someone else. That said, I know the importance of activities such as posts like this.

I mentioned in another recent post the fact that I recently went back to school for my fifth degree, the first one that’s actually in fisheries science. I also noted in that other post that, rather than discovering how unqualified I had been prior to engaging in the formal training of coursework, I had reinforced my opinion of what a gulf there is between us and everyone else working in lake management and pond management in this state.

Those who read this blog regularly may have noticed that, while I do sometimes give specifics on management techniques we regularly employ, I often am vague in that regard. This is very intentional on my part: more than a couple techniques and strategies pertaining to Tennessee lake management and Tennessee pond management that we pioneered have now been copied by our competitors, who of course conveniently omit the key detail of where they got it, when sharing the technique with clients or potential clients.

We have for many years employed a strategy that many would deem experimental. When we first began recommending it to lake and pond owners in the public realm, more than a couple other pond folk openly mocked us: they said it would never work, or would give the landowner the opposite of what he was seeking in his pond. Since then, more than a couple of those same folks have begun recommending this strategy, from time to time, to pond owners; as you might guess, never once have we been given any credit for it.

We read widely in fisheries, particularly in the area of freshwater, warmwater lakes and ponds. We just happened to come across a study a few days ago that points to the distinct possibility that this marginalized, seldom-utilized (at least in the private fisheries world) technique we have been employing for decades, could well be the technique that revolutionizes lake and pond management in this country.

We’re in the early stages of a study that will tell the tale, one way or another. File it away: you read it here first: within the next ten years, Trophy Pond will revolutionize Tennessee lake management and Tennessee pond management (along with Alabama pond management and Alabama lake management, Georgia lake management and Georgia pond management, Kentucky lake management and Kentucky pond management, etc.) Write the date on your calendar because it’s coming.